15 Nov 2017

West London Mental Health NHS Trust has improved its scores in the Care Quality Commission’s (CQC) 2017 annual Community Mental Health Survey results.

The Community Mental Health Survey is part of a wider programme of NHS surveys, which cover a range of topics including acute inpatient services, children’s inpatient and day-case services, A&E (emergency department) and maternity services. This survey collates the experiences of people receiving community mental health services plus primary care mental health services, community recovery teams and early intervention services, comparing them across mental health trusts nationally and with last year’s scores.

The National Service User Survey was undertaken for the Trust between February and June 2017, and the findings are based on 199 responses from service users in the community. This year’s results found 85% of service users felt they had been treated with dignity and respect by the Trust, and 81% felt the person they had seen listened to them carefully – both figures have shown an increase of 5% from 2016.

70% of people also said they knew who to contact out of hours if in a crisis – compared to 63% in 2016. Overall, 24% of service users rated their experience as ‘Good’ and 53% as ‘Very Good’. Only 6% rated their experience as ‘Poor’ – and this has reduced by 4% from last year.

However, only 43% of service users said they knew who was in charge of their care if the people they saw for care and services had changed in the last 12 months, but in 2016, more had felt better informed (48%).

As well as this, 73% said they felt treatments or therapies that did not involve medicine were explained in a way they could understand, but more service users understood these aspects in 2016 (85%). 65% also said they were involved as much as they wanted in deciding on treatments or therapies, whereas more had felt involved in 2016 (77%).

Carolyn Regan, Chief Executive of West London Mental Health NHS Trust, said: “We are very pleased to see improvements to many of our scores since the last survey, which is an occasion to celebrate and very encouraging for the Trust. It’s really pleasing to see that the scores for being treated with dignity, respect and kindness have increased significantly, which is testament to the caring approach shown by our staff.

“But we know that improvements are still needed, such as making service users understand clearly who is in charge of their care, especially when staff move on to other roles and there may be a gap, plus ensuring that treatments and therapies are also clearly explained. Involving service users and patients in decisions about their medication is part of a big project we have commissioned with West London Collaborative, so that we work together with service users to improve this aspect of their experience of the Trust.”

For further information about the community mental health survey, including results for all 56 providers and the summary report, please visit: www.cqc.org.uk/cmhsurvey